Hurricane Maria Relief for Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic

Hurricane Maria Relief for Puerto Rico

We want to provide relief to Hurricane Maria Victims in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Our students and staff at Osceola Christian Preparatory School have families or loved ones that were directly affected by the recent storms. And we want to do something to help.

We are inviting you to join us!

This year, we want to challenge each teacher and their class to bring in as many supplies as possible. We are asking for parents, guardians, and those interested to help our students bring in dry goods, supplies, and food that are needed in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. As an incentive, the class that brings in the most supplies gets a free lunch.

Here's a list of relief items needed:
  • - Batteries (AAA to DD)
  • - Flashlights
  • - Water bottles
  • - Diapers, baby wipes, and similar products
  • - Soap, hand sanitizer, and similar products
  • - Towels, rags, and similar
  • - Toiletries (Deodorant, toothbrush, etc.)
  • - Bug spray
  • - Non-perishables like boxed food and snacks
  • - Canned goods
  • - Powdered drinks/food
  • - Trash bags, ties, and etc.

 

Please contact Ms. Hickson, Ms. Duran, or Ms. Hawkins for more details. We will also do special picture postcards to send to loved ones who are hard to get a hold of; no matter who brings in the most supplies, EVERYONE WINS!

Picture Day Reminder

Hello OCPS Families,
Thank you so much for making the start of this school year amazing!  Each child is a joy and blessing to us at Osceola Christian Preparatory School.

We would like to remind you that Picture Day is this Thursday, August 18th.  Because there is no retake day, we request all students to be in attendance wearing their uniforms.

Picture Day is this Thursday, August 18th.

If you did not purchase them during open house, IDs with lanyards cost $10 and will be available after pictures are taken.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask front desk or call us at 407-729-5974.

Let’s continue to work together to have a blessed school year.

Blessings, 

Osceola Christian Preparatory School
1515 Michigan Ave.
Kissimmee, FL 34744
407-729-5974
info@osceolachristianprep.com
http://osceolachristianprep.com

What was the “#” originally called? Octothorpe?

Did you Know octothorpe was the original name for a hashtag?

In present day…

The # has been used in social media and referred to as a hashtag. The idea of calling it “hash” came out in the 1970s. It has also been referred to as the pound sign and the number sign. It had been called the pound sign because when scribes wrote it “lb”, a line was often slashed across the top of the “lb” creating a similar appearance to the “#” symbol. However, not to confused with the British form of currency, they would refer to it as the number sign, such as in a number two pencil (#2). Other names for the symbol include “tic-tac-toe,” “crunch,” “square,” etc.

Octothorpe was actually a made up word.

It was formulated by technicians when creating the “*” and “#” symbols on the phone in the 1960s. It had many spelling deviations: octothorp, octotherp, octatherp, etc. One of the theories of why they chose that name was that it had the appearance of a town surrounded by eight fields, “octo” meaning eight and “thorpe” meaning fields. Another theory was that it was named after an athlete, Jim Thorpe.

Read more about the origins of octothorpe at these references:

Did You Know? Ampersand

Did you know the ampersand was once part of the English alphabet?

In the early to mid 1800’s, schools would include “&” as the 27th letter of the alphabet. Examples can be seen in M. B. Moore’s 1863 book, The Dixie Primer, for the Little Folks.

The original name of the word, however, was “and” – not “ampersand.” Students would recite the alphabet and finish with “X, Y, Z, and per se and.” The meaning of “per se” is “by itself” in Latin.  Eventually, “and per se and” was shortened to ampersand.

However, “&” existed long before ampersand, about 1,500 years before. Romans would record Latin in cursive. When they wrote “et,” they would often combine the letters, ultimately leading to the eventual formation of &. If you ever see &c, instead of etc. used, you will have a better understanding why and its origin.

The more you know…

Share with your friends and let them know!